Through the life of this blog in its many guises I have used Blogger, Community Server and WordPress. Now comes the time to move again and I have opted to use MiniBlog; a project created by Mads Kristensen of Visual Studio Web Essentials fame.

About MiniBlog

MiniBlog is written in ASP.Net, C# and uses the website template in Visual Studio. It has a simple architecture and persists the blog posts in XML format as physical files on the web server drive. There is much more to this platform though such as:-

  • Windows Live Writer support
  • RSS and ATOM feeds
  • Support for robots.txt and sitemap.xml
  • Much much more…

Why move?

Although I have had a great experience using WordPress over the past few years, I have become more apparent of the bloat that is downloaded to the users browser in the form of Java Script and CSS. As a developer who strives to optimise web pages to get a better UX for the user, this didn't sit right with me.

old-js

This is the old sites Java Script showing over kb of data downloaded to the users browser.

old-css

The CSS is also loaded with the many styles from various plugins used in WordPress.

Wordpress is written in PHP and my experience is .Net, also the back end it's MySQL again a technology I am not 100% experienced with. So to make the changes to optimise the blog to a level I was happy with would leave me with either rewriting the entire theme and persistence layer or move to a technology stack I can have more control over. MiniBlog gives me this. I can create the style and layout I want with Razor and CSS and tweak the caching layer in the C# code. I can also get gulp up and running to run tasks to concatenate and minimize the css and Java Script files. Also like other projects I am working on, I can easily create a work flow in Team City to do the build and deploy.

What I had to do

Firstly I had to export all my blog posts from WordPress into a format that MiniBlog can understand. Again thanks to Mads Kristensen I could use the MiniBlogFormatter tool to get my posts into the correct format. This tool outputs each post to a seperate XML file. Then going through the current blog I found and separated post I wanted to keep that covered topics and technology that are still current. Then I created a temporary website in IIS to test these posts. It soon became apparent that the directory structure was different and MiniBlog uses a post directory to store files. I didn't want to loose any links to popular posts especially those that are referred to from other sites, so I created a url rewrite rule to do redirects to the new structure for users coming in on the old url.

Optimization

As I have mentioned in a past post concatinating and minification of Java Script and CSS can be achieved by using gulp. Once this was done, the number of files downloaded was much less than before.

new-js

Now only 16 files are downloaded as opposed to 46 in the old site.

new-css

Also with the CSS, there are only 2 as opposed to 7 requests.

With the images, I used Paint.Net to decrease the resolution and size for better performance.

Then in IIS, I navigated to the HTTP Response Headers section for the directories that contain the Java Script and CSS files.

iis 

Clicked on the ‘Set common headers’ link in the top right hand corner.

http-headers

Set the expires date to a date far into the future.

Comments

I was getting a lot of spam comments which Akismet took care of, so I had to find an alternative which would also protect me. I enjoy reading the comments and like to respond so switching off comments was not an option. I eventually went for Disqus which has a plugin architecture that was really simple to implement.

So there you have it, this is now the new blog site. It will change in style over the next few weeks as I make tweaks here and there, but with the CI/CD workflow I have in place this is very easy to work with.

What next?

I run all my sites of the same box which also has both MySQL and SQL Server running on it, so soon I can switch off MySQL, uninstall the PHP processor that it's part of IIS and hopefully free up some more resources.

Happy coding