tags: JavaScript, Web, Tooling

LibMan or Library Manager is a slim and fast package manager that comes with Visual Studio 2017 and 2019 that can be used to download and manage not only JavaScript, but also CSS.

Why use it?


Sometimes package managers such as npm seem to be a little overkill when all you are wanting is a simple JavaScript file downloaded and managed centrally within your project. I personally try and limit my npm packages as I find their reliance on external modules can sometimes break things and can bloat my project file structure somewhat. With Bower being wound down, it leaves a hole for simple package management which has been filled nicely with LibMan.

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tags: C#, JavaScript, TypeScript

Some years ago I started a little library written in F# to perform calculations for astronomy. This was published on an open source platform hosted by Microsoft of which the name escapes me it was that long ago. I never did much maintenance with it for many years and it was just for learning about functional programming. Since then I have created the ObsPlanner website for astronomy which uses many hand written JavaScript routines as well as lots of C# code that do similar things to the JavaScript ones. Because of this I have created a repository on GitHub which I aim to build up over the coming months that is a cross language astronomical library for performing basic functions such as:-

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tags: Windows 10, UWP, JavaScript

I am working on an app for the Windows Store that requires mapping functionality. As it is a Windows app, it seems logical to use Bing Maps as they also provide an SDK for apps. Currently it is at version 8, but I had a few problems implementing that version so went for version 7 with the hope to upgrade it at some point when I get more traction for the app.

Firstly you need to go to the Bing Maps Developer portal and sign in to request an API key for your project.

Click on the Create Key link and enter some details about the app. For store apps, a key type of Basic should suffice as we are not doing any enterprise level development. Choose Universal Windows app for the type and any URL you have for your in dev app (I use a placeholder page on my website where the app privacy policy etc. are going to go).

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tags: Windows 10, UWP, JavaScript

If you want to monetize your UWP apps, it might be part of you plan to have some kind of trial so that uses can try out the basic functionality of your hard work. This can be achieved in two places, firstly you need to test and set the properties in the app. Then you need to change the properties of your app submission in the Windows Dev Center. So here I will cover how we write the code to test for a trial installation of your app.

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